The Potato Hack: One Year Anniversary

Wow!  Can you believe it’s been a year since I released my book, The Potato Hack: Weight Loss Simplified? Much to my great surprise, the book is still selling well around the world and getting good reviews. Just this week on Amazon:

revs

I picked the right time for a potato diet book for sure. Not only are potato diets now “all the rage” thanks to the likes of Andrew “Spudfit” Taylor (I even wrote the foreword to his book!) and Penn Jillette, both who credit all-potato diets with massive weight loss. But also resistant starch and gut health are constantly in the news, further leading people to my book.  I noticed a big jump in sales last week, and then started getting notes from people who watched Dr. Oz discuss the power of resistant starch and the health benefits of potatoes.  Now I just need Dr. Oz to say, “Read Tim’s book, The Potato Hack!”

Future Plans

Audiobook: Tantor Media is putting the final touches on an audiobook version of The Potato Hack, it should be available in April. The narrator will be Matthew Boston, he has a really great voice…you can listen to a sample of his narration here: Time is the Simplest Thing.

Chinese Translation: I’m working with the China Agriculture Press for a Chinese version of the book. In their last update, they told me they were trying to figure out how to translate the title so that it would be understood when translated. You’d think China would understand “hack” pretty well, lol.

Thanks!

A huge, heartfelt thanks to everyone who helped to get the book off the ground, and to all of you that purchased the book. It was a fun year, a great learning experience, and I feel like I might have actually helped a few people along the way.

Tim Steele

 

 

20 Comments on “The Potato Hack: One Year Anniversary”

  1. kbseddon March 28, 2017 at 8:18 am #

    ‘You’d think China would understand “hack” pretty well, lol.’
    Lol.
    There goes your goodwill with China! 😉

    Maybe the unequivocal corrections of all Dr. Oz’s fallacies by the eloquent Art Ayers has made Oz re-evaluate his world view on health!

    Like

    • Tim Steele March 28, 2017 at 9:02 am #

      It’s a good thing I’m not running for office. WikiLeaks would have a blast posting my emails, colluding with China to perpetrate global hacking.

      Like

    • Gemma March 29, 2017 at 12:50 am #

      “Much to my great surprise, the book is still selling well around the world and getting good reviews.”

      That’s great news, Tim! Congratulations!

      @Karl Seddon

      I have been planning to ask you for a long time, going to use the chance now. You seem to be combining your business interests in probiotics mixes with the interests in the fiber supplement (another quagmire), but have you been considering yet another part: micronutrients (deficiencies in the food resulting form deficient soils)?

      For instance, in a recent discussion I was participating in someone raised an idea that the Irish famine / potato blight atack was not quite caused by an unusually virulent potato blight hybrid but by the fact that the soils were depleted of certain micronutrients (due to mismanagement, overuse for the potato production, for example)?

      Such micronutrient deficient soils resulted in immune system deficiencies, first of the the potato plants themselves, and later on of the people who were eating such micronutrient depleted foods (potatoes in the case of the Irish).

      So the question is whether some people cannot get health benefits from either probiotics or fiber supplements because the third part is still missing.

      Like

      • kbseddon April 4, 2017 at 10:00 am #

        @Gemma

        Hi Gemma,
        I would think that the vitamin micronutrient deficiencies in humans could mostly be corrected via resolution of a dysbiosis, since so many of our vitamins are manufactured by microbes in the gut. With a few exceptions.
        As for mineral micronutrient deficiencies, I would agree that there may be widespread deficiencies due to modern processes stripping soils of minerals and resulting in even ‘healthy’ diets being deficient.
        But that could be remedied by a run-of-the-mill mineral supplement. I am not sure whether people who are unresponsive to probiotics and prebiotics are that way due to something akin to a cofactor relationship (e.g. pairing vitamins together). I think it would be more likely that the probiotic was simply not effective for them based on the microbiotic profile they currently have and that the prebiotic was either feeding the wrong type of microbe or feeding nothing at all.
        ‘Wrong type’ is also contextual, since if you are depleted of microbes that stimulate T-Reg production, then feeding up microbes which modulate the aggressive portion of the immune system could be said to be feeding up the ‘wrong type’ of microbe.
        Correcting micronutrient deficiencies may be extremely helpful or even essential. But I am not sure if it would be in a cofactor style of action. Perhaps vitamin D is an exception to that though (defensin expression, etc.)
        Kind Regards,
        Karl

        Like

        • Gemma April 4, 2017 at 11:54 pm #

          Hi Karl

          Thanks for taking time to answer.

          “As for mineral micronutrient deficiencies, I would agree that there may be widespread deficiencies due to modern processes stripping soils of minerals and resulting in even ‘healthy’ diets being deficient.”

          So we agree on this. Nice.

          Further reading for those who are interested:

          A study on the mineral depletion of the foods available to us as a nation over the period 1940 to 1991 (Thomas, 2003)

          “Correcting micronutrient deficiencies may be extremely helpful or even essential. But I am not sure if it would be in a cofactor style of action. ”

          Obvisously this is the case, they serve as cofactors in many vital processes.

          Food for thought: correcting micronutrient deficienciesis is probably more “essential” than delivering this or that kind of a microbe via a probiotic supplement.

          Posting a wiki link for those who like to look at it deeper:
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cofactor_(biochemistry)

          “Metal ions are common cofactors.[8] The study of these cofactors falls under the area of bioinorganic chemistry. In nutrition, the list of essential trace elements reflects their role as cofactors. In humans this list commonly includes iron, magnesium, manganese, cobalt, copper, zinc, and molybdenum.[9]”

          Like

          • Tim Steele April 9, 2017 at 6:49 am #

            Finally got around to reading the links. Very interesting, and most likely a huge piece of the puzzle. I regards to the paper on mineral deficiencies, I have to wonder how it was possible to so accurately predict the exact mineral content over 50 years. Assay methods change, and random samples can vary widely. The author’s conclusion is that we all need a “good quality prophylactic supplement” to replace nutrients missing from the soil. I shudder to think what Big Pharma would create, and I am not impressed with what’s on the store shelves now. So where does that leave us?

            Like

            • Barney April 11, 2017 at 6:53 am #

              Look to the sea for your missing minerals?

              Like

          • kbseddon April 11, 2017 at 11:15 pm #

            Hi Gemma,

            You quote me and reply below:

            ”“Correcting micronutrient deficiencies may be extremely helpful or even essential. But I am not sure if it would be in a cofactor style of action. ”

            Obvisously this is the case, they serve as cofactors in many vital processes.

            I already clarified (just ONE paragraph above!) what I mean by this:

            ‘I am not sure whether people who are unresponsive to probiotics and prebiotics are that way due to something akin to a cofactor relationship (e.g. pairing vitamins together). I think it would be more likely that the probiotic was simply not effective for them based on the microbiotic profile they currently have and that the prebiotic was either feeding the wrong type of microbe or feeding nothing at all.’

            It seems pretty clear to me but perhaps I needed to reiterate.
            My statement referred to the relationship between minerals and probiotics/prebiotics not being in the style of the usual cofactor relationship. It didn’t extend beyond that.
            My use of the word ‘cofactor’ wasn’t a random coincidence, lol!
            As I am sure anyone who has done biology class as a 10 year old will be aware of the cofactor purpose of minerals/vitamins.

            ”Food for thought: correcting micronutrient deficienciesis is probably more “essential” than delivering this or that kind of a microbe via a probiotic supplement.”

            Lol… i am not quite sure this is ‘food for thought’. It’s a fairly simple statement! 😉

            Jokes aside, our opinions definitely differ on the relative prevalence of dysbiosis vs mineral deficiencies and how they respectively determine the pandemic of modern ailments!

            For dietary mineral deficiency, If in doubt, just take a mineral supplement or modify diet accordingly. Simple. (If absorption is the problem, then this would be related to gut health and thus a separate issue.)

            The same can’t be said for probiotics… yet. The species range isn’t there right now.

            I hope this reply helps in clarifying my opinion on the topic.

            Kind Regards,
            -Karl

            Like

            • Barney April 12, 2017 at 8:15 am #

              @Karl Seddon

              Does this mean you think the gut bacteria have no relationship/dependence on the available minerals?

              Like

              • gabriella April 13, 2017 at 2:49 pm #

                Barney, I think his focus is on bacteria. Minerals don’t come into it.

                Like

              • kbseddon April 14, 2017 at 12:05 am #

                Hi Barney,
                Google various combinations of: biofilm, chelation, lactoferrin, quorum sensing (vitamins), magnesium, etc. (these ones are just off the top of my head). It will turn up the majority of what I think the interplay is.
                Thanks.
                -Karl

                Like

  2. gabriella March 28, 2017 at 8:45 am #

    Great news Tim.

    Computer hack or hacked to death hack? Maybe they could look at the Russian expression for it and then translate.

    Like

  3. Costas March 28, 2017 at 8:50 am #

    Tim, I would like to thank you too for your fantastic book. Being an Orthodox Christian athletic male (cyclist and, used-to be, weight lifter) I abstain from animal produce (meat, lactic {milk, cheese etc} fish, vegetable oils) most of the year (40 days at Christmas Lent, 47 at Easter Lent, 30 during the Apostles’ Lent, 15 during the Dormition of All-Holy Theotokos and on Wednesdays and Fridays all year round) so I now consume just plain potatoes with some tahini and honey for dessert and Seafood with Olive Oil on Weekends. I have lost twenty kilogrammes so far! I had resorted to eating beans, which I did not like, and now I feel liberated with the Potato Hack!!!

    Like

    • Tim Steele March 28, 2017 at 9:00 am #

      Thanks for the nice words and great testimonial. I think it’s easy to lose your way when navigating through unlimited food choices. Just eating potatoes makes things so much easier, and provides ample nutrition. Maybe not forever, but for a while. That’s what I find most people need the worst…a way to eat right for a little while so they can get back on track. I get emails and messages continually from people saying they are “back on the potatoes” and want some help with figuring out why they keep gaining weight. The answer is usually obvious when you look at the foods they normally (over)eat. I think our brains and bodies are perfectly suited to an all-potato diet and not at all suited to a non-stop 24/7/365 all-you-can-eat smorgasbord of highly processed treats.

      Like

  4. Wilbur March 28, 2017 at 10:22 am #

    Oops, I said the following in an incorrect post. Sorry!

    The good news keeps coming in! Congrats!

    Have you thought about approaching the potato growers associations about maybe a Google ad when somebody searches about potatoes and health and/or weight loss? Or maybe a New York Times or WSJ Review ad? Maybe I’m unique, but those are probably the only places I look at ads because I’m always searching for books. I did a Google search on “potato growers associations” and it seems there are many, at least 10 I think. Your book fits nicely with their core job. “Don’t eat more potatoes. Eat only potatoes!” I get royalties if you use that lol. It might get even more notice if it’s paired with Jillette, dunno.

    Like

    • Tim Steele March 28, 2017 at 12:33 pm #

      I hit up the potato industry really hard the first couple months, but it was sort of a dead-end. I was featured in PotatoPro, Potato Grower, and a couple other industry magazines, but it didn’t amount to much. I kept hoping they’d use my book for potato propaganda, but they are more interested in growing and processing potatoes than losing weight.

      A magazine called Potato Review (http://www.potatoreview.com/category/potato-review-latest-edition/) did an article, saying, “It’s a potato marketing executive’s dream scenario. A weight-reducing diet plan composed entirely of our favourite tubers – and just the occasional glass of water.” [no longer available online].

      A couple others:

      http://www.potatogrower.com/2016/03/book-touts-potatoes-health-benefits
      https://potatonewstoday.com/2016/04/11/book-touts-potatoes-health-benefits/

      Mostly people find my book by Googling “potato diets.” There are probably 20-30 fairly substantial reviews floating around, plus my blogs and mentions on other blogs. So I think my book has a good longevity factor, and it’s unique. I tried doing Facebook and Google Ads and found that they never paid for themselves very well. I’d rather sell to people who search for me than be in everyone’s face hoping they buy.

      I keep hoping to get picked up by one of the big booksellers like you see in airports and shopping malls, but with those type avenues, they get books at steeply discounted rates where my royalty is about 25 cents per book.

      Like

  5. Debbie March 28, 2017 at 1:29 pm #

    Congratulations, Tim! The times they are a-changin’! It’s only a matter of time before the potato is fully loved and appreciated!

    Like

  6. Dan April 2, 2017 at 1:53 pm #

    Congrats to you Tim, leading the potato charge 🙂 As I’m planning to do my next round of all potato, I checked out interviews with Jillette. Apparently, his potato hack lasted 15 days and there were claims that it was not done not so much for satiety but to reset his taste buds in the direction of foods less sweet, less salty, less processed, less fatty.

    In your experience, is retraining the taste buds a big benefit of the potato diet?

    Like

    • Tim Steele April 2, 2017 at 3:09 pm #

      “Retrain taste buds” is not very scientific, but that’s a good way to think about it, lol. I think the effects are much deeper than the taste buds, a potato diet seems to have retrain your entire brain. I’m sure that the term “retrain taste buds” is just given figuratively, but foods do taste much more intense after a week of denial.

      Like

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